URBAN MURAL

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I may be incredibly boring and a bit despondent (at times!) But I have a great excuse, I am an aspiring planner.

twitter.com/igushonti:

    thisbigcity:

Shared space roads, where cars, cyclists and pedestrians are expected to mix, have received criticism for being unsafe for the visually impaired. Will this textured surface on London’s first shared space road help? More on This Big City.
共享空間道路讓汽車、單車與行人共用同一條道路,但受人批評對視障者不方便,增設路面刻紋後,對英國倫敦第一條此類道路會有幫助嗎?全文請見《城事》。

Well I think this will go down swell!!!
There are more of these shared space roads (in small portions) e.g Peckham High Street and on Walworth Road which were once known for the speedy traffic, but now crossing in these areas has become a lot easier. As they are being rolled out across London in small doses, more users (peds, cycl, drivers), especially drivers will get used to it,  so I’m confident that it can work on a larger scale…although I still think there will be issues for disabled users- I wonder if there are any promotional / training support for the visually impaired using these new street designs?
Look forward to the update.

    thisbigcity:

    Shared space roads, where cars, cyclists and pedestrians are expected to mix, have received criticism for being unsafe for the visually impaired. Will this textured surface on London’s first shared space road help? More on This Big City.

    共享空間道路讓汽車、單車與行人共用同一條道路,但受人批評對視障者不方便,增設路面刻紋後,對英國倫敦第一條此類道路會有幫助嗎?全文請見《城事》。

    Well I think this will go down swell!!!

    There are more of these shared space roads (in small portions) e.g Peckham High Street and on Walworth Road which were once known for the speedy traffic, but now crossing in these areas has become a lot easier. As they are being rolled out across London in small doses, more users (peds, cycl, drivers), especially drivers will get used to it,  so I’m confident that it can work on a larger scale…although I still think there will be issues for disabled users- I wonder if there are any promotional / training support for the visually impaired using these new street designs?

    Look forward to the update.

    (Source: thisbigcity)

    — 2 years ago with 24 notes
    #urban design  #planning  #streets  #streetscape  #exhibition road  #this big city 
    Great introduction for planning and food →

    GOOD FOOD FOR GOOD PLANNING

    Great introduction to the relationship between planning and food. I used this in conjunction with the new London plan in a recent essay and its really useful. At the moment food and spatial planning is not really built into my course, but its discussed in terms of sustainability, urban design and the contribution of planning to other fields.

    Its inspired me enough to get in touch with Sustain and I’m currently doing some research on some case studies to update this document…wooo-ooo!!

    — 2 years ago with 14 notes
    #sustain  #food  #urban argiculture  #sustainable development  #sustainable comm  #planning  #urban design 
    WILL BIRMINGHAM CLEAN UP?


Birmingham currently asks its residents to put black bags full of  rubbish, including food waste, out on the streets every week with  recycling in open boxes collected every 2 weeks.
On most streets around the city, this means that by the time the  lorries arrive to collect the stuff we put out, bags have been ripped  open by rats, birds, foxes or cats and on windy days (like recently) the  recycling is blowing all over the street. http://www.karmadillo.co.uk/b31/?p=5725

The second biggest city in the UK could challenge rubbish collection and recycling practices nationally but is the will of change there? or could we see the introduction of more standardised approaches set elsewhere?
I will be following this one…. update to follow later

    WILL BIRMINGHAM CLEAN UP?

    Birmingham currently asks its residents to put black bags full of rubbish, including food waste, out on the streets every week with recycling in open boxes collected every 2 weeks.

    On most streets around the city, this means that by the time the lorries arrive to collect the stuff we put out, bags have been ripped open by rats, birds, foxes or cats and on windy days (like recently) the recycling is blowing all over the street. http://www.karmadillo.co.uk/b31/?p=5725

    The second biggest city in the UK could challenge rubbish collection and recycling practices nationally but is the will of change there? or could we see the introduction of more standardised approaches set elsewhere?

    I will be following this one…. update to follow later

    — 2 years ago with 11 notes
    #birmingham  #waste management  #bb1 voices  #sustainability  #recycling  #planning  #urbanism 

    Madrid Rio Project

    This looks like a major project which I think is really interesting artistic and exciting. I love the idea that it will be based on:

    ·         A greening of the city and in turn restores the environmental balance.

    ·         An improved transportation system which will hopefully rebalance the rights and access to spaces for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

    ·         The project will also re-establish connections to the river; improve the water quality and river bed.

    ·         There will be increased opportunities for recreational use and therefore providing for future health opportunities.

    ·         Improvements in urban design and transportation

    ·         Sustainable restoration of building

    However what about:

    ·         Food growing

    ·         Displacement of the current population. I can hear the complex sociological discussions already…..

    Anyway it will be fantastic for cities to be revitalised in this way- I wonder if anything is in the pipeline for the Victoria embankment in London.

    Good luck Madrid

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #madrid rio  #sustainable development  #urban planning  #urban design  #city regeneration  #environmental protection  #environmental re-balance  #urban scale  #major city projects  #europe  #spain 
    The organic truth →

    Im currently researching  the challenges that planners in London face around building and supporting sustainable food resources and so this article by is particularly interesting to me at the moment.

    In this article she talks about how marketing organisations and food producers are now targeting LOHAS (Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability) with organic food which is not necessarily healthy and although organically produced is not necessarily sustainable . She identifies this as chocolate made from ‘organic coco’ and coconut water, both very popular with organic foodies .

    As a Londoner from an ethnic minority group, a point within the article that really struck me was on the question of Western demand for quinoa

    Personally I am not into this or is it a native food source of my parents, but to date with my research, I have found that many writers currently support the local independent shops and produce found in many inner city deprived neighborhoods as a good example of local access to healthy foods, supermarket rivalry and a more sustainable source. However, while I dont doubt that some of the carrots, potatoes and peas are healthy and maybe locally sourced , what about the Yam, plantain and casava? While these are healthy foods, these are not local in anyway, and if they are given our climate they are not organic.

    So my questions around sustainable food and the potential of planning is:

    1. In a globalised locality how do you grow organically and encourage better use of local traditional foods in a community where local is segregated, culturalized and sometimes feels entirely foreign?
    2. While evidence of community growing and local farmers market is evident throughout the UK, what is being done to challenge less sustainable but organically produced foods that arrive by Air to UK supermarkets international isles and local shops?
    3. Is there an educational gap on the ‘organic truth’ and are planners ready to challenge sections of the community on the less sustainable food choices?
    — 2 years ago with 88 notes
    #Sustainable Food  #organic produce  #london  #Kendra Pierre-Louis  #planning  #sustainable community  #locality  #globalisation 
    Thanks for sharing this. I got a copy of this a couple of weeks ago and had a quick dabble through and I thought it was quite well done. There are some very interesting ideas and themes coming through which I hope we will see implemented in the future.

irishboyinlondon:

Towards a fine City for People -  Public Spaces and Public Life in London - 2004
My christmas reading - Jan Gehl’s excellent report on London; “Towards a Fine City for People” which “describes the present conditions in London and pinpoints the barriers and obstacles pedestrians have to overcome when walking in London.” Well worth reading! London still has a long way to go.  Read the project summary here and the main report here.

    Thanks for sharing this. I got a copy of this a couple of weeks ago and had a quick dabble through and I thought it was quite well done. There are some very interesting ideas and themes coming through which I hope we will see implemented in the future.

    irishboyinlondon:

    Towards a fine City for People -  Public Spaces and Public Life in London - 2004

    My christmas reading - Jan Gehl’s excellent report on London; “Towards a Fine City for People” which “describes the present conditions in London and pinpoints the barriers and obstacles pedestrians have to overcome when walking in London.” Well worth reading! London still has a long way to go.  Read the project summary here and the main report here.

    (Source: buildgreatcities)

    — 2 years ago with 13 notes
    #jan gehl  #urban design  #urban planning  #streetscape  #irish boy in London 
    ZIP ACTIVATION OF OUR STREETS
Jihyun David has designed a series of new street furniture inspired by msterdammertjes  and the dutch bike’s culture in the hope to recapture the city streets and remind local residence of its importance as a social rather that a people traffic domain. The objectives of Zip are simple and as follows:
Zip is about Amsterdam. By combining two of the symbols of Amsterdam, bikes and red bollards,  it creates a new icon of Amsterdam’s design.
Zip is Fun. It’s fun to ride it and it’s Leuk to take a picture on it!
Zip is about Re-Use. Low footprint on the environment, recycling,  are in the DNA of the project
Zip It’s about re-discovering public space. By providing comfort and fun, ZIP can transform an empty space into an attractive spot.
ZIP is for people and not for cars.  It invites people to consider the importance of the street as a social space instead of a mere traffic domain.
Zip is temporary & nomad.
ZIP is a project by Jihyun David

    ZIP ACTIVATION OF OUR STREETS

    Jihyun David has designed a series of new street furniture inspired by msterdammertjes and the dutch bike’s culture in the hope to recapture the city streets and remind local residence of its importance as a social rather that a people traffic domain. The objectives of Zip are simple and as follows:

    • Zip is about Amsterdam. By combining two of the symbols of Amsterdam, bikes and red bollards,  it creates a new icon of Amsterdam’s design.
    • Zip is Fun. It’s fun to ride it and it’s Leuk to take a picture on it!
    • Zip is about Re-Use. Low footprint on the environment, recycling,  are in the DNA of the project
    • Zip It’s about re-discovering public space. By providing comfort and fun, ZIP can transform an empty space into an attractive spot.
    • ZIP is for people and not for cars.  It invites people to consider the importance of the street as a social space instead of a mere traffic domain.
    • Zip is temporary & nomad.
    • ZIP is a project by Jihyun David

    — 2 years ago with 13 notes
    #urban design  #sustainability  #bikes  #amsterdam  #zip  #Jihyun David 
    massurban:

“This Is What 7 Billion Looks Like (Infographic)
Jerry James Stone  December 6, 2011
As you know by now, our planet now has a population of 7 billion people. As fellow TreeHugger Brian Merchant put it, “That means 7 billion people who get hungry, need space, and disagree with things that the other 6.999999999 billion people say.” And as Brian points out, that means 7 billion people who want electricity, to drive cars, who want clean water, internet access, etc.
But what does 7 billion actually look like?
This great infographic by Fathom, appropriately titled Dencity, shows us. Larger dark circles show fewer people while brighter circles have a denser population.
Nonetheless, Fathom does a great job of displaying the situation we are in. We hit 7 billion just twelve years after hitting 6 billion, and 24 since we hit 5 billion. This growth is being driven primarily by the developing world. For example, Africa’s population, which just passed 1 billion, is expected to double come 2050.”
Via: Treehugger
Image: © Fathom

    massurban:

    This Is What 7 Billion Looks Like (Infographic)

    Jerry James Stone  December 6, 2011

    As you know by now, our planet now has a population of 7 billion people. As fellow TreeHugger Brian Merchant put it, “That means 7 billion people who get hungry, need space, and disagree with things that the other 6.999999999 billion people say.” And as Brian points out, that means 7 billion people who want electricity, to drive cars, who want clean water, internet access, etc.

    But what does 7 billion actually look like?

    This great infographic by Fathom, appropriately titled Dencity, shows us. Larger dark circles show fewer people while brighter circles have a denser population.

    Nonetheless, Fathom does a great job of displaying the situation we are in. We hit 7 billion just twelve years after hitting 6 billion, and 24 since we hit 5 billion. This growth is being driven primarily by the developing world. For example, Africa’s population, which just passed 1 billion, is expected to double come 2050.”

    Via: Treehugger

    Image: © Fathom

    — 2 years ago with 9 notes
    #population growth  #mass density  #7 billion